Posts tagged “avian

Sweet Briar Lake, North Dakota

Yes, you can hear the trucks in the background from I-94 but that is the only negative thing about this wonderful place.

Driving across country last summer, my husband and I were always on the lookout for nice, clean, free campgrounds.  We found a handful that we remember with fondness and this one tops the list.

Sweet Briar Lake was, I think, create by a dam, and it appears to be a good fishing spot.  But if you care about birds, this place is a bonanza.  From just our little spot overlooking the lake we watched white pelicans, double-crested cormorants and canada geese swim around and generally busy themselves, and heard red-winged blackbirds make their lovely background music.  Most likely a walk around the lake would have resulted in seeing more species but we were more than thrilled to just stay put and enjoy this peaceful display.

Advertisements

Kolea, Akekeke & Honu

It’s interesting to see which bird species congregate together, or at least tolerate each other if their habitats overlap.  In this case it’s the Pacific Golden-Plover and Ruddy Turnstone, or in Hawaiian terms Kolea and Akekeke, respectively.

These birds were foraging on the lava rock beach on the western coast of the Big Island of Hawaii.  The turnstone is keeping itself busy in the shallow pool, bathing and looking for food, possibly turning stones over like its name implies it should.  It draws the attention of two plovers who seem determined to intimidate the turnstone, or at the very least keep an eye on him or her.  The plovers are only slightly larger than the turnstone, 1/4 inch in length, according to National Geographic Field Guides, but maybe that’s enough to be the generally more dominant species.  There are photos of other sights in this area underneath the video, such as a green sea turtle (Honu, in Hawaiian), a wasp and what I think is a Wandering Tattler.


Randall Davey Audubon Center, Santa Fe

My husband and I were a little disappointed about only seeing a couple of birds at the Randall Davey Audubon Center in Santa Fe but we went during the hottest part of the day in early May so we weren’t too surprised.

There were numerous finches at the feeder, a gorgeous hawk moth at some flowers, a squirrel keeping busy digging in the dirt, and an unknown bird foraging in the bushes and parking lot.

What makes this place special are of course the volunteers and the beautiful terrain including the hillside trails, and the gorgeous adobe buildings.  And the awesome bee hotel deserves a mention.  I’d like to go back someday when it’s a little cooler, perhaps in the winter when there are more birds around.


Salida, Colorado: Sands Lake SWA

The second part to the amazing May 2017 birding experience I had in Salida, Colorado was Sands Lake State Wildlife Area.  It consists of Sands Lake and a stretch of the Arkansas River – my husband and I spent about an hour walking the lovely trails and walkway along the river.

The lake has had a lot of effort put into it to be bird friendly.  Two islands naturally create a safe atmosphere for waterbirds like pelicans, geese and ducks.  And at least two nesting platforms have been put up, as well as a handful of (floating?) platforms scattered around the lake.

The most exciting sighting of the day was an American Dipper, a first for me.  And I even managed to get a decent shot of it.

We also saw a yellow-rumped warbler, several yellow warblers, cedar waxwings, and tree swallows in areas along the river and lake.  A memorable sighting was the pair of ospreys, one on a nest and the other perched on a light pole nearby.  Below are the rest of the photos.  Hope you get to visit Salida some day!


Raven’s nest in moose antlers

A few years ago I went with my husband up the Dalton Highway to Prudhoe Bay.  We stopped a few different places including a storage yard and former state camp called Happy Valley where I found one of the most wonderful things I’ve ever happened upon… a raven’s nest in a mounted rack of moose antlers with two babies in it!


Wild Turkeys in Hawaii

Wild urkey on the Big Island of Hawaii

There are tons of wild turkeys on the Big Island of Hawaii!  They roam the golf courses and lava rock fields searching for insects, lizards, seeds, berries and anything else that’s edible and relatively small.   It’s a lovely thing to see.

The Wild Turkey evolved in America and was domesticated by Native Americans.  In the early 1500s turkeys domesticated by the Aztecs were taken to Europe and interestingly enough, their descendants were brought back to America by the pilgrims who soon found out their indigenous neighbors were raising them too.

They soon spread to China and in 1788 they were introduced from there to the Hawaiian islands. Over the years, more have been released, whether purposely or not, by ranches and farms and perhaps by people who wanted to hunt them.  Currently you can hunt them on the island along with pheasant, doves, francolin, quail, as well as introduced mammals such as goats, sheep and boar.

Turkeys especially prosper on the Big Island because of it’s dry grassy sloping landscapes, and as you can see, they seem right at home.


An Entwined Zebra Dove

Stage at Ala Moana Mall - Honolulu, HawaiiThe Ala Moana Mall in Honolulu Hawaii is not exactly a birder’s paradise.  If you’ve ever been there Zebra Dove on stage at Ala Moana Mallyou’ve probably seen the stage near the Waikiki side entrance.  On the day of my visit it was draped in red curtains that created a deeply textured vision of color on the floorboards.  Hence the photographs.

Oftentimes birds are there, probably because people feed them.  Mall birds.  Not exactly picturesque herons or majestic bluebirds.  More like zebra doves and rock doves (pigeons).  (Are pigeons, like, flying mall rats?)

But every one of those mall birds are just as worthy and deserving of life as any heron or bluebird.  So it broke my heart when I discovered that this little zebra dove had its legs entangled with some of kind of thread or very thin fibers.  The poor thing managed to walk but its appearance was disheveled, skinny, sickly.  The entanglement was taking its toll.Entwined Zebra Dove  You can see its entwined legs clearly in the silhouette photo on the left (click to enlarge).

I look back at that moment with regret.  I regret that I did not help that bird.  I Zebra Dove on Ala Moana Mall stagecould have found some big gloves and grabbed the bird and cut that twisted piece of twine that was holding it hostage.  That would have at least given it a chance.

As you can see it came right over to me, along with several pigeons, probably looking for a generous person tossing scraps.  It was close enough to me so that I could have done it!

But no, there were no gloves and I am not that gutsy.  Not that spontaneous.  And maybe it’s not a good idea to touch a bird that might be diseased or to take these matters into my own hands.

All I know is, we need to do more for the birds that are affected by our carelessness.

This is what a healthy zebra dove looks like, found right down the street near the Ala Wai Boat Harbor.

Zebra Dove in Waikiki