Kolea, Akekeke & Honu

It’s interesting to see which bird species congregate together, or at least tolerate each other if their habitats overlap.  In this case it’s the Pacific Golden-Plover and Ruddy Turnstone, or in Hawaiian terms Kolea and Akekeke, respectively.

These birds were foraging on the lava rock beach on the western coast of the Big Island of Hawaii.  The turnstone is keeping itself busy in the shallow pool, bathing and looking for food, possibly turning stones over like its name implies it should.  It draws the attention of two plovers who seem determined to intimidate the turnstone, or at the very least keep an eye on him or her.  The plovers are only slightly larger than the turnstone, 1/4 inch in length, according to National Geographic Field Guides, but maybe that’s enough to be the generally more dominant species.  There are photos of other sights in this area underneath the video, such as a green sea turtle (Honu, in Hawaiian), a wasp and what I think is a Wandering Tattler.

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